Category: Mathematics

Things of Science

Things of Science LogoI am scanning a lot of Things of Science lately. As a way to keep a handy, sorted reference to the scanned booklets, I created this post. I will update it as I add new units.

1959

Things of Science #222 — Atomic Energy

1960

Things of Science #232 (Feb) — Herb Seeds

Things of Science #234 (Apr)— Sextant

Things of Science #235 (May) — Straight Line

Things of Science #236 (Jun) — Hexaflexagon

1966

Things of Science #306 B — Topology

Things of Science #313 — Measurement

1967

Things of Science #318 — Center of Gravity

Things of Science #321  — Magnetism

Things of Science #322 — Buoyancy

Things of Science #323 — Chromatography

1968
Things of Science #327 — Touch

Things of Science #329 — Computer

Things of Science #330 — Salt

Things of Science #331 — Linkages

Things of Science #332 — Sundial

Things of Science #333 — Sound

Things of Science #334 — Aerodynamics

Things of Science #335 — Corrosion

Things of Science #336 — Heat

1969

Things of Science — Probability

Things Of Science #306 B — Topology

Things of Science Logo

An unusual Things of Science, both for the size of its booklet (a full U.S. letter size; 8.5″ x 11″) and also for how text-heavy this unit is.

The subject of this unit, topology, is a fairly complex concept in mathematics and Things of Science, as usual, gives it a very thorough treatment. Perhaps this unit was intended for a fairly sophisticated and advanced learner. While they approach the subject in easy to grasp terms, it is hard to see twelve-year-old me being very engaged.

Here is the diagram-heavy booklet (not too many “things” in this unit though):

Things of Science #306 B — Topology

Things of Science — Probability

Things of Science 38This Things of Science must be newer than the previous ones I posted. It isn’t numbered, The booklet too has gone from the larger 5″ x 6″ format to a narrower 3″ x 5″ (and nicely stapled now).

The “experiments” in this unit read more like math problems (not surprising, I suppose). But, again, like the best of Things of Science, the math is approached very practically — that is, by rolling dice, picking colored disks at random out of a box, etc. So it brings a very down-to-earth understanding of a complex topic.

Here is the booklet:

Things of Science — Probability

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