Category: Uncategorized

Atomic Ballet (1953)

A dancer, named Sally McCloskey, was photographed at Angel Peak (about 30 miles outside Las Vegas, Nevada) in 1953. She did an interpretive dance for the photographer while, in the background, the Operation Upshot-Knothole atomic bomb test created the familiar mushroom cloud in the sky.

Apparently it was not unusual to see those early above-ground atomic tests from Las Vegas.

“I’’d have one girl, Sally McCloskey, we did a little series that was called Angel’’s Dance. And she was a ballet dancer, not a showgirl, and she did an interpretive dance to the mushroom cloud as it came up and we shot a series of pictures and sent it out on the wire and they called it Angel’’s Dance. We just did anything we could to make the picture a little bit different because the newspapers would run the mushroom cloud pictures, but they were always hungry for anything that had any kind of a different approach.”

Donald English, Photographer.

Sally McCloskey doing the Atomic Ballet at Angel Peak.

Sally McCloskey doing the Atomic Ballet at Angel Peak.

Sally McCloskey doing the Atomic Ballet at Angel Peak.

Sally McCloskey doing the Atomic Ballet at Angel Peak.

Here is a video of the atomic test that Sally McCloskey danced in front of.

Also the atomic cloud here.

Things of Science #263 — Silicones

Things of Science unit from September, 1962 on silicones. Another one of the sort of “material sciences” units.

Here is the booklet:

Things of Science #263 — Silicones

More Things of Science scanned here.

The things:

Silicones

Things of Science #250 — Survival Food

Things of Science unit from August, 1961 on survival food. And sure enough, it contained survival food — fifty-six years old!

Of course I didn’t eat it. But of course it crossed my mind.

Here is the booklet:

Things of Science #250 — Survival Food

More Things of Science scanned here.

The things:

Survival Food

Language of Flowers

People have long attributed meaning to flowers. Starting in Ottoman Turkey and popular in Victorian England, the language of flowers, also called floriography, is “a means of cryptological communication through the use or arrangement of flowers.” The meaning assigned to each flower varied, but a consensus emerged for the meaning of common flowers.

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